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Khums Calculation

Surplus

Amount you own, in British Pounds ?
Calculated on your khum due date.
Equivalent amount, in British Pounds, of foreign currency you own ?
Calculated on your khum due date.
Debts owed to you that you expect to be repaid ?
Do not include this if it was accounted for in previous financial years.
In-kind possessions not used for sustenance ?
This includes buildings, farms, factories, commodities, work tools, and any household items or possessions not used for sustenance. Calculate these at present value if they were acquired with surplus income on which a year has not elapsed, and at cost price if they were acquired with surplus income on which a year has elapsed. If acquired with a combination of income, then calculate these at present value in relation to what was acquired with surplus income on which a year has not elapsed, and at cost price in relation to what was acquired with surplus income on which a year has elapsed.
Financial dues ?
This includes the due of key premium (surqufliah), the due of utilising agricultural lands owned by the state, and the due of revival of lands which are fenced and prepared for residency. Calculate these at present value if they were acquired with surplus income on which a year has not elapsed, and at cost price if they were acquired with surplus income on which a year has elapsed. If acquired with a combination of income, then calculate these at present value in relation to what was acquired with surplus income on which a year has not elapsed, and at cost price in relation to what was acquired with surplus income on which a year has elapsed.
Amount you utilised prior to your khums due date ?
This is cash which was subject to khums prior to your khums due date, and which you have already spent (e.g. If this is the first year you pay khums, despite having needed to pay khums in previous years)
Fungible items you utilised prior to your khums due date ?
These are fungible items which were subject to khums prior to your khums due date, and which you have already utilised. Calculate these according to present value. Fungible items are those which are freely exchangeable or replaceable, in whole or in part, for another item of a similar nature, such as machinery or factory-produced fabrics.
Non-fungible items you utilised prior to your khums due date ?
These are non-fungible items which were subject to khums prior to your khums due date, and which you have already utilised. Calculate these according to their value at point of utilisation. Non–fungible items are unique items, such as unique paintings, monuments, and unique jewelry.
Amount you already paid with intention of Sahm Al-Imam ?
Amount you paid with the intention of Sahm Al-Imam before your khums due date.
Amount you already paid with intention of Sahm Al-Sada ?
Amount you paid with the intention of Sahm Al-Sada before your khums due date.

Deductions

Commercial debts ?
Include all commercial debts you still owe others.
Remaining sustenance debts taken in the financial year ?
Include debts borrowed in the financial year for accommodation (mortgage), a car, etc. Please refer to more detailed rulings for accounting for mortgages.
Remaining sustenance debts taken in previous financial years ?
Include debts borrowed in the previous financial year for accommodation (mortgage), a car, etc. The asset (house, car, etc.) must still be in your possession. Calculate only the amount that you have not deducted from your profits in previous financial years. Please refer to more detailed rulings for accounting for mortgages.
Amount you own which has already been subjected to khums ?
Calculated on your khums due date. Includes the remainder of funds that were subject to khums in previous years and on which you have already paid khums.
Notes
  1. 1) Your khums due date is the first day you started your job or business. If you are retired or not in employment, then you can agree a khums due date with a representative of the marja'a, or calculate separate khums years for each profit that you make, from the date you made that profit.
  2. 2) The khums of commercial commodities and real estate(s) which are intended for trading, should be paid in accordance with their current market value, even if they were bought with profits which a year has elapsed on, unless the price at which they were bought is higher than the current value.
  3. 3) If the calculations show that the amount of khums due is negative as a result of sustenance debts, then the amount of the sustenance debt equivalent to the amount of khums due for the rest of the item is calculated and excluded.
  4. 4) If sustenance debts are fully repaid in the financial year, this amount is excluded from the profits.
  5. 5) Possessions which are not subject to khums are:
    1. a. Possessions owned through inheritance:
    2. i. Cash
    3. ii. Real Estate
    4. iii. Objects that are transferrable and the like
    5. b. Possessions owned by the wife from the dowry (mahr):
    6. i. Cash
    7. ii. Gold Jewellery
    8. iii. Home furniture and the like
    9. c. Possessions used for personal or family provisions from the profits of that financial year:
    10. i. Home residence
    11. ii. Home furniture and other household items
    12. iii. Gardens used for leisure and to personally benefit from their fruit
    13. iv. Personal or family cars
    14. v. Animals that are benefited from by the household such as a cow for milk or a chicken for eggs
    15. d. Debts owed by others that you do not expect to be repaid.
    16. e. Items purchased through debt that has not yet been repaid.

Total amount subject to Khums 0

Khums Due 0

Sahm al Imam to be paid 0

Sahm al Sada to be paid 0

Qurbani Lessons of Hope and Faith

06 July 2021

We are at the start of a new journey.  
As we enter Dhul Hijjah, the “month of the pilgrimage”, one of the most blessed times after Ramadhan, we look forward to further strengthening our faith Insha’Allah. 
This last month of Islamic calendar offers the promise of a fresh start: an opportunity to consider our spiritual goals and how we may better ourselves in the eyes of Allah (SWT). 
Participating in Hajj and offering an animal sacrifice to honour Prophet Ibrahim (AS) on Eid al-Adha are part of our faith, but even for the rest of us who don’t have the possibility to perform Hajj, here are some other amazing lessons we can take from the story of Ibrahim’s: 

Obedience to God 

When God told Ibrahim (AS) in a dream to sacrifice his son in His name, both father and son accepted this task with unwavering trust in God’s plan. In the end, Allah (SWT) stopped the sacrifice, and a beautiful ram was offered in the son’s place. 
Our Qurbani also symbolises our loyalty to Allah (swt). We’re taught to follow His command without faltering because He will always lead us towards happiness. 

Adopting a more patient approach 

Sometimes, we can’t see the forest for the trees. Especially when we become overwhelmed with not just our personal lives, but with events happening on a larger scale, such as the global pandemic.  
In these times, we’re reminded that we need to have patience and once again put all our trust in our Maker, as it is advised in the Quran: 

“And indeed we will try you with fear, hunger, damage to your wealth and lives and give glad tidings to the patient” (Al-Baqara: 155).  

Sometimes, the most patient are those who have been through several trials in their lives. The orphaned children we care for at Al-Ayn are some of the most hopeful children in the world, always willing to learn more and overcome the trauma of their past. And this is something we can all learn from. 

Teaching our children spiritual values 

Ibrahim (AS) is not only a symbol of faith, but also a great example of fatherhood. He raised Ismail (AS) to love Allah (swt) so much that Ismail didn’t even flinch when his father recounted the tragic dream to him. 
This month gives us an opportunity to reflect on our parenting style and understand how we can instil more love for Allah (swt) into our children’s hearts.  
Even more so, we can show love and empathy to those children who don’t have a parental figure in their lives—the orphaned childrens. In doing so, we not only please Allah (swt) but also follow the footsteps of our Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) who adored orphaned children more than he did anyone else. 

You can donate a gift of clothes to a child this Eid al-Adha, so they can too celebrate this blessed festival and commemorate the story of Qurbani and faith in Allah (swt). 

Al-Ayn helps perform and distribute your Qurbani sacrifice to families of orphaned children living in poverty in need in Afghanistan and Iraq. Book your Qurbani today. 


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